Blessing and curse in pandemic times

Blessing-and-curseLast week my son and I were watching the fifth Harry Potter movie, Order of the Phoenix. There’s a moment where two teenagers are kissing on a bench, and with a flick of her wand, Dolores Umbridge separates them by several feet.

We’ve seen this film several times before. But this time, six months in to the pandemic, my son joked, “Look, Mom, social distancing!” And we both laughed.

The laughter feels complicated for me as a parent. I know he’s layering this pandemic experience over what he sees in movies or on tv because it helps him process needing to stay apart. It breaks my heart that he has to do that. And I’m also glad that he can find a way to make sense of what’s happening, and even to joke about it, as we stay apart from loved ones in order to keep each other safe.

In this week’s Torah portion, Ki Tavo, Moses says: I want these six tribes to stand on this mountain for a blessing, and those six tribes to stand on that mountain for a curse. Reading that verse this year, my mind made the move my son keeps making: “look, it’s social distancing!” Okay, obviously not. But then I thought: actually, this matter of blessing and curse does feel relevant.

Torah teaches, “Cursed be he who moves his fellow countryman’s landmark.” Literally, moving someone’s landmark means causing them to be lost. Spiritually, this verse resonates for me as a teaching about gaslighting. One who claims that the pandemic is hype, denying the reality of more than six million cases in the United States alone, is denying reality’s landmarks.

Torah teaches, “Cursed be he who misdirects a blind person on his way.” In a literal sense, this teaching seems obvious. Spiritually, I think of the claims about quack remedies for covid-19, from hydroxychloroquine to drinking bleach. Remember when emergency rooms started reporting an uptick in people who poisoned themselves by blindly following that bad advice?

Torah teaches, “Cursed be he who subverts the rights of the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow.” In Torah’s paradigm, this is a way of saying “the powerless.” Torah here condemns the one who disenfranchises or harms those who are vulnerable. I don’t think that one requires any translation. Literally and spiritually, it’s a clear instruction for this pandemic moment.

And then Torah says: the curses aren’t our only option. If we observe the mitzvot and act in accordance with God’s commandments, we will experience the opposite outcome. We’ll be blessed in our homes and in our fields, our flocks and our herds, in city and country, in our comings and in our goings… if only we observe the mitzvot and do not deviate from them.

In years past I’ve struggled with the blessings and curses articulated in Torah. The curses seem so punitive. I don’t believe in a God Who sits on high and throws punishments at us like lightning bolts from Mount Olympus! Many of you have told me over the years that that’s not your theology either, and that encountering it each year in Deuteronomy is challenging. For me, too.

But this year I’m reading these verses through the lens of global pandemic. This year I don’t see these as teachings about divine punishment at all. I’m reading them as teachings about our power to shape the world in which we live. I think Torah is reminding us that we bring about the blessings or the curses by dint of our choices. (And suddenly it feels like Yom Kippur.)

If we gaslight each other, if we misdirect each other, if we subvert each others’ rights — those actions themselves are curses, and they carry their own consequences with them. They harm the fabric of community. They damage trust. And in this pandemic moment, they contribute to the spread of the virus that continues to ravage our interconnected human family across the globe.

And if we do what’s right — if we persist in the discomfort of our masks and strict social distancing in order to protect each other and especially to protect the vulnerable — those actions themselves are blessings, and they carry their own consequences with them, too. When we choose to act in those ways, we bless each other with our mutual concern and care.

May we continue to bless each other with our mutual concern and care, through this pandemic and beyond.

 

This is the d’varling that Rabbi Rachel offered at Shabbat morning services (cross-posted to Velveteen Rabbi.)

 

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