Wholeness, justice, and peace

 

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A d’varling for Pride Shabbat and Shabbat Korach.

In this week’s Torah portion, Korach, there’s a rebellion. Korach stands up against Moses and demands power. He cloaks his demand in words that sound nice — aren’t all God’s people holy? — but it becomes clear that he doesn’t want to democratize spiritual power, he wants to claim it for himself and his sons. So, the earth opens up and swallows Korach and his followers.

Korach insists he deserves to be in leadership, but he really wants power. He doesn’t want to be a public servant, he wants to be a bigshot. Torah offers us this fantasy: what if the earth swallowed the power-hungry? Imagine what a world we could build if all of the Korachs just disappeared! We can’t rely on that. But maybe it can help us envision what ethical leadership really is.

God instructs Moses to take a staff from the leader of each of the 12 tribes and put them all in the Tent of Meeting overnight. In the morning, Aaron’s almond-wood walking stick has flowered and borne fruit. With that, the rebellion is truly over. Everyone can see who God has chosen to be in spiritual service to God and to the community. The question for me is: why Aaron?

Pirkei Avot 1:12 says, “Be like the students of Aaron: loving peace and pursuing it.” During homeschooling earlier this year, my son and I read some Pirkei Avot together. I asked him what he thinks the difference between those two things might be. “You can love something, but not do anything to make more of it,” he said. “Pursuing it means running after it, trying to make it happen.”

Tradition holds that Aaron pursued shalom (peace) and shleimut (wholeness). That’s why his staff was blessed to flower: because he actively pursued shalom. But what is peace, really? It can sound kind of wishy-washy. It can sound like a band-aid we put over community divisions and injustices in order to ignore them. That’s a false peace, a spiritual-bypassing peace.

Shalom and shleimut don’t mean the absence of war, and they don’t mean that false peace, the band-aid that papers over injustice. They mean integrity, living in alignment with what’s right. In Rabbi Brad Artson’s words: “Shleimut, wholeness, means offering to the world the fullness of who you are at your best: your beauty as you are, your greatness as you are.”

Reading those words this week, I was struck by how right they feel for Pride Shabbat. Coming out likewise means offering to the world the fullness of who one is. And as Rabbi Artson continues, shleimut also means inviting others to live out their truest selves too. When we stand in our truth and let our authentic selves shine, we give others permission to do likewise.

Aaron pursued peace. That verb also appears in the verse, “Justice, justice shall you pursue.” As my kid reminds me, pursuing means taking action. When we act for justice, we lay the groundwork for peace. Today’s protestors say “No justice, no peace.” I’ve also seen signs that say, “Know justice, know peace.” When we know justice inside and out, then we’ll know shleimut.

Justice means equal rights for everyone: for people of every gender expression and sexual orientation, people of every race and ethnicity. Justice means safe access to healthcare for everyone: including queer and trans people and people of color. Justice means equal treatment under the law for everyone: for queer and trans people, and for people of color, and for all of us.

Justice means fundamental human rights and dignity for everyone, because we’re all created in the image of God. These are core Jewish values. Our world doesn’t quite live up to them yet. We still have a lot of work to do before everyone can safely know shleimut, the wholeness that comes from offering the world the fullness of who we are. That work is our calling as Jews.

Korach said we’re all holy, but he really meant: I want more power for me and those who are like me. We can be better than that. We can build better than that. And when we do, then we won’t need to fantasize anymore about the earth swallowing the power-hungry. And then structures that had seemed wooden and lifeless will flower and bear fruit. As Judy Chicago wrote in 1979:

And then all that has divided us will merge
And then compassion will be wedded to power
And then softness will come to a world that is harsh and unkind

And then both men and women will be gentle
And then both women and men will be strong
And then no person will be subject to another’s will

And then all will be rich and free and varied
And then the greed of some will give way to the needs of many

And then all will share equally in the Earth’s abundance

And then all will care for the sick and the weak and the old

And then all will nourish the young
And then all will cherish life’s creatures

And then everywhere will be called Eden once again.

 

This is the d’varling that Rabbi Rachel offered at Zoom Kabbalat Shabbat services on Friday night (cross-posted to Velveteen Rabbi.)

 

One comment

  1. Rachel, Check out James Baldwin speaking on Ken Burns’ Statue of Liberty documentary.

    Also, I have some sad news. My younger son died of the complications of a lifetime of mental illness recently. Please pray for peace for his soul and for our family. God has been in the outpouring of love and support from our family and friends.

    On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 8:37 PM CBI: From the Rabbi wrote:

    > velveteenrabbi posted: ” A d’varling for Pride Shabbat and Shabbat > Korach. In this week’s Torah portion, Korach, there’s a rebellion. Korach > stands up against Moses and demands power. He cloaks his demand in words > that sound nice — aren’t all God’s people holy? ” >

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