Pursuing justice

“Justice, justice, shall you pursue.” (Deut. 16:20)

Or in the translation of my friend and colleague Rabbi Mike Moskowitz, “Resist so that you may exist.” Because Torah says we are to pursue justice in order that we may live.

It’s not enough to support justice. Agree with justice. Nod our heads about justice. We’re supposed to pursue it. To run after it. To seek it with all that we are.

We need to pursue justice because without justice we cannot wholly live.

We need to pursue justice because without justice, life isn’t wholly living.

Cornel West wrote that “Justice is what love looks like in public.” If we love the other — and Torah is quite clear that we should: “love the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt” is repeated no fewer than thirty-six times in Torah — the way we are to express that love is by seeking justice.

And where there is no justice, “love” is a hollow word. In the absence of justice, love loses its meaning. If someone says they love you, but they won’t pursue justice for you, then their love is at best false and at worst highly damaging.

What does it mean for us to pursue justice?

It means acting ethically. Always. Without fail. As much as we can.

On a personal level, it means discerning where we’ve fallen short, apologizing to those whom we’ve harmed, and pursuing restitution for those whom we’ve harmed. That’s the work of this time of year. (This is classical Jewish teaching; see Maimonides on teshuvah.)

Communally, social justice means “equal distribution of opportunities, rights, and responsibilities” across our differences. [Source.] If the systems of our society prevent any subgroup from having equal opportunities, rights, and responsibilities, that isn’t justice. 

A world in which people of color are systematically disenfranchised from voting is not justice. (This week at havdalah when it’s time to #BeALight, we might choose to support Fair Fight.) I’ll bet we can all can think of other examples of injustice needing to be repaired. 

Communally, social justice means “equal distribution of opportunities, rights, and responsibilities” across our differences. [Source.]

I would argue that a world in which people of color are systematically disenfranchised from voting is not justice, and that our responsibility is to ensure that others have the same rights we do. I’ll bet you can think of other examples of injustice needing to be repaired. 

Pursuing justice means acting with integrity to uplift those who are disempowered — in Torah’s paradigm, the widow and the orphan; in today’s paradigm, those who experience systematic discrimination.

This is our work in the world as Jews. This is our work in the world as human beings. This isn’t new, but this year it seems more important than ever.

So here’s my prayer today:

Please, God, strengthen our commitment to justice. Strengthen our readiness to not only uplift justice but to pursue it, to run after it, to seek it with all that we are. Because without justice, the world is broken.

And with justice — only with justice — we can aim to live up to our highest aspirations as individuals and as a society. With justice, we can live up to what God asks of us.

Because justice is what God asks of us. And justice is what we should ask of our government, and our communities, and our own selves. Justice is what we’re called to pursue, all the days of our lives.

Kein yehi ratzon.

This is the d’varling that Rabbi Rachel offered at CBI on Shabbat morning (cross-posted to Velveteen Rabbi.) It was followed with last year’s Torah poem: Pursue.

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